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Consultation details

Have your say on the draft Naming Policy

Event date: 11/11/2019 8:00 a.m. - 11/12/2019 5:00 p.m. Export event

We are updating our Naming of Streets, Reserves and Community Facilities Policy (now to be known as the Naming Policy) – last reviewed 10 years ago. The policy’s purpose is to provide a consistent approach to naming streets, reserves, community facilities and public places in Tauranga. Note that this does not include suburb names as these are decided by the New Zealand Geographic Board. 

We are proposing several key changes, outlined below. Among these, we’re proposing to include some provisions in the policy to encourage locally significant Māori names for streets and public places, giving greater visibility of mana whenua connections to Tauranga’s places. Read through our proposed changes and let us know what you think. 

What you’ve already told us

In August we ran a survey to get people’s thoughts about better reflecting Māori heritage in the names we choose for our streets, reserves and other public places. We received 843 responses – thank you!

What’s in a name? Survey responses August 2019 (415kb pdf)

The results from the survey combined with the feedback from this formal consultation will help councillors make a decision on the content of the final policy, in 2020.

Submissions closed 5pm on Wednesday, 11 December 2019

Statement of proposal (66kb pdf) Draft Naming Policy (184kb pdf)

Hearing of submissions will take place in 2020. If you have any questions, please contact the Policy team on 07 577 7000 or emma.joyce@tauranga.govt.nz

To help you visualise how the policy would work, we’ve presented the different proposed naming processes in a few flowcharts. These are for information only, not part of the policy and are subject to change.

Proposed naming processes – flowchart view (65kb pdf)

Proposed changes to the policy, and why we want to make them

Proposed change – scope: Expand the scope of the policy to include all streets, reserves, other public places (any place open to or being used by the public), and community facilities under the control of Council.
Why: The current policy only includes streets and reserves. Including all public places will help provide a consistent approach across all of Tauranga. 

Proposed change – purpose: Add into the purpose of the policy to encourage Māori names for streets, reserves, community facilities and public places in Tauranga and to enable greater visibility of mana whenua connections to Tauranga.
Why: We want to better reflect our Māori heritage in the names we choose. 
Survey feedback: about 80% of respondents agreed that we should encourage more names that are locally significant to mana whenua from the Tauranga City Council area to reflect our shared history.

Proposed change – prioritisation: Prioritise local identity, historical significance and significance to mana whenua in the naming of new streets, reserves, community facilities, and other public places.
Why: Prioritisation will encourage local names as opposed to international names with little or no connection to Tauranga.

Proposed change – dual naming: Support dual naming of new and existing streets, reserves, community facilities and other public places. This means they could have both a te reo Māori and an English name. Examples include Pukehinahina, Gate Pā Domain, or Aoraki, Mt Cook. The te reo Māori name would come first – except for streets where the English name has to come first to comply with the Australia New Zealand standard for addressing. The names don’t have to be a direct translation from one language to the other. Dual naming is not considered renaming in this policy as we won’t necessarily remove the existing name.
Why: To ensure the identity of the city is recognised and maintained in naming public places. To encourage Māori names for streets, reserves, community facilities and public places in Tauranga and to enable greater visibility of mana whenua connections to Tauranga.
Survey feedback: 65% of respondents thought we should enable new and existing streets, reserves, facilities and public places to have both an English and a te reo Māori name.

Proposed change – renaming: Allow for renaming of existing reserves, community facilities and public places (except beaches and streets). Renaming means removing the current name and replacing it with another one. This name could be an existing Māori name not in common use. We would give priority to names that reflect the identity of Tauranga, the historical significance of the area, or the significance of the area to mana whenua from the Tauranga City Council area.
Why: To ensure the identity of the city is recognised and maintained in naming public places. To encourage Māori names for reserves, community facilities and public places in Tauranga and to enable greater visibility of mana whenua connections to Tauranga. Council will only change existing street names following major changes in road layout or infrastructure, where necessary to avoid confusion, duplication or ambiguity, or where an incorrect name has become established over time by local usage.
Survey feedback: 70% of respondents supported allowing the renaming of reserves and public places.

Proposed change – criteria for street names: Add a character limit (16 characters + road type) as a criteria for street names together with the existing criteria of “easy to pronounce” and “easy to spell”.
Why: Having specific criteria for street names is to ensure that streets are easily identifiable for purposes such as emergency services. 

Proposed change – commercial: Establish that new streets and reserves cannot be named after commercial enterprises.
Why: A commercial enterprise may not be locally significant and is another form of advertising. Naming after a commercial enterprise would be inconsistent with the principles in the draft policy. 

Proposed change – private applications: Remove the option of private applications to rename streets if the street name does not meet the naming criteria and where 80% of ratepayers in the street are in agreement to the change.
Why: All street names should meet the general naming criteria before being approved. The criteria has been amended to allow for street name changes where an incorrect usage has been established over time. It is unlikely that a private application could fund associated costs and obtain 80% agreement.

Proposed change – public consultation: Require consultation on the dual naming or renaming of existing reserves and other public places (except streets). This includes any names proposed by mana whenua. There is no requirement in the draft policy to consult on names for new reserves or public places. Feedback on the name of a new reserve would be received through broader engagement on the reserve development.
Why: Council appreciates that the community may feel a sense of ownership with the existing names of a reserve or public place. We want to know if you support the draft policy requiring consultation on dual naming and renaming of existing reserves and public places, or if you think this is a decision that Council could make without consultation. When we asked this question as part of the survey we received a range of responses.
Survey feedback: Your feedback told us that we need to consider who we consult with, particularly with regards to consulting with hapū. Some respondents suggested that only consulting with kaumatua or kuia was enough. Other people wanted to be able to give feedback directly on the name, whereas others were happy to simply be informed of the name, its meaning, and the correct pronunciation.

Posted: Nov 6, 2019,
Categories: Consultation,

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